SpaceX concept video shows the future of controlled re-entry space

September 5, 2016 – 08:45 pm

SpaceX Falcon HeavyWith a fresh round of funding from Google to the tune of $1 billion, Elon Musk's SpaceX is firmly in the lead position of the commercial space race.

But the company is still working to convince any doubters out there that what it's doing with reusable rockets is truly revolutionary, and now a new concept video offers a better look at the company's vision for more sustainable space travel.

Set to a track that sounds suspiciously like Iron Man (Musk's unofficial nickname) movie music, the video shows the Falcon Heavy taking off and then separating the two boosters from the center core in space.

Once separated, the two boosters use thrusters to position themselves for re-entry, while the center core delivers its payload and then performs the same process of positioning itself a controlled landing back on Earth.

But Musk, one of the most transparent figures in the space industry, wasn't afraid to show off the high profile failure. The company posted footage of the unsuccessful controlled landing for all to see on Vine, with the words, "Close, but no cigar. This time."

Rocket made it to drone spaceport ship, but landed hard. Close, but no cigar this time. Bodes well for the future tho.


Source: mashable.com

You might also like:

[720p]The Future of SpaceX 108
[720p]The Future of SpaceX 108......
Elon Musk Describes the Future of Rocket Design | SpaceX
Elon Musk Describes the Future of Rocket Design | SpaceX ...
SpaceX unveils "future of space travel" capsule
SpaceX unveils "future of space travel" capsule
Elon Musk: 10 Lessons In Business, Innovation And Entrepreneurship From The Self-Made Billionaire And Visionary (Tesla, SpaceX, And The Quest For A Fantastic Future)
eBooks ()

Related posts:

  1. History of SpaceX
  2. Watch SpaceX
  3. What does SpaceX do?
  4. Vandenberg SpaceX
  5. President of SpaceX
  • avatar What is Elon Musk's Masterpiece: SpaceX, Paypal or Tesla?
    • You don't need to separate them or rank them. Rather, when you take them as a whole you can see that they fit together perfectly. Briefly,


  • avatar How many times will Elon Musk finance another launch if SpaceX doesn't make it into orbit?
    • A private company called SpaceX launched its 3rd rocket which failed a few minutes after launch. Stages failed to separate in the rocket, which caused the rocket to go off course and fail structurally. It was launched from an island in the Pacific Ocean, so there is no danger of debris falling on populated areas. I am sure the company is insured for such an eventuality.