Tesla Adds Titanium Underbody Shield and Aluminum Deflector

February 26, 2018 – 12:02 pm

In 2013, two extremely unusual Model S collisions resulted in underbody damage that led to car fires. These incidents, unfortunately, received more national headlines than the other 200, 000 gasoline car fires that happened last year in North America alone. In both cases, the occupants walked away unharmed, thanks to the car’s safety features. The onboard computer warned the occupants to exit the vehicles, which they did well before any fire was noticeable. However, even if the occupants had remained in the vehicle and the fire department had not arrived, they would still have been safely protected by the steel and ceramic firewall between the battery pack and the passenger compartment.

It is important to note that there have been no fire injuries (or serious, permanent injuries of any kind) in a Tesla at all. The odds of fire in a Model S, at roughly 1 in 8, 000 vehicles, are five times lower than those of an average gasoline car and, when a fire does occur, the actual combustion potential is comparatively small. However, to improve things further, we provided an over-the-air software update a few months ago to increase the default ground clearance of the Model S at highway speeds, substantially reducing the odds of a severe underbody impact.

Nonetheless, we felt it was important to bring this risk down to virtually zero to give Model S owners complete peace of mind. Starting with vehicle bodies manufactured as of March 6, all cars have been outfitted with a triple underbody shield. Tesla service will also retrofit the shields, free of charge, to existing cars upon request or as part of a normally scheduled service.

During the course of 152 vehicle level tests, the shields prevented any damage that could cause a fire or penetrate the existing quarter inch of ballistic grade aluminum armor plate that already protects the battery pack. We have tried every worst case debris impact we can think of, including hardened steel structures set in the ideal position for a piking event, essentially equivalent to driving a car at highway speed into a steel spear braced on the tarmac.

We believe these changes will also help prevent a fire resulting from an extremely high speed impact that tears the wheels off the car, like the other Model S impact fire, which occurred last year in Mexico. This happened after the vehicle impacted a roundabout at 110 mph, shearing off 15 feet of concrete curbwall and tearing off the left front wheel, then smashing through an eight foot tall buttressed concrete wall on the other side of the road and tearing off the right front wheel, before crashing into a tree. The driver stepped out and walked away with no permanent injuries and a fire, again limited to the front section of the vehicle, started several minutes later. The underbody shields will help prevent a fire even in such a scenario.


Source: www.teslamotors.com

You might also like:

Elon Musk on Tesla’s “Navy Seals” layoff approach (2008)
Elon Musk on Tesla’s “Navy Seals” layoff approach (2008)
MarketWatch CEO of the Year: Tesla’s Elon Musk
MarketWatch CEO of the Year: Tesla’s Elon Musk
Elon Musk defends Tesla’s outlook (2011)
Elon Musk defends Tesla’s outlook (2011)

Related posts:

  1. SpaceX Elon Musk
  2. CEO Elon Musk
  3. Tesla Elon Musk d11
  4. Tesla and Elon Musk
  5. SpaceX Musk
  • avatar What company is Elon Musk currently the CEO of?

    • Three Tesla employees dead in small plane crash
      SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A small airplane crashed and killed three Tesla Motors employees in northern California on Wednesday, the electric car maker's chief executive said.
      A Cessna 310 struck an electrical tower after taking off on Wednesday morning, crashed into a residential neighborhood and killed all three people on board, according to local police. Tesla confirmed all had worked at the car company.
      Tesla is withholding the employees' names while it works with authorities to notify their families, Chief Executive Elon Musk said.
      "Tesla …