SpaceX Launches Falcon 9 v1.1 on Maiden Flight

March 4, 2016 – 04:41 am

SpaceX Launch Update: This Sunday SpaceX will attempt to launch the first Falcon 9 v1.1. While similar to the original Falcon 9, the upgraded version sports the more powerful Merlin 1D engines which have yet to fly, a much longer fuselage, a new larger fairing and a number of other upgrades to the rocket including its software. The launch will be webcast.

SpaceX is categorizing this launch as a "demonstration flight" with the risk higher than usual for a Falcon 9 launch. However I don't expect them to launch unless they are as certain as they can be of mission success.


Source: nasawatch.com

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  • avatar Anyone know likely avenues of investigation for kernel launch failures that disappear when run under cuda-gdb? Memory assignments are within spec, launches fail on the same run of the same kernel every time, and (so far) it hasn't failed within the debugger.
    • cuda-gdb spills all shared memory and registers to local memory. So when something runs ok built for debugging and fails otherwise, it usually means out of bounds shared memory access. cuda-memcheck might help, depending on what sort of card you are using. Fermi is better than older cards in that respect.


      EDIT:
      Casting my mind back to the bad old days, I remember having an ornery GT9500 which used to throw similar NV13 errors and have random code failures when running very memory intensive kernels with a lot of shared memory activity. Never when debugging. I put it down to bad hardware …